Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Appeals Court Shoots Down Copyright Challenge

Appeals Court Shoots Down Copyright Challenge
by THOMAS CLABURN
Information Week, publication date: 23 January 2007
"Beyond extending the term of copyright protection, these two laws changed the copyright renewal procedure for works created prior to 1978 from an 'opt in' system to one that is 'opt out.' Copyrights thus are now renewed automatically to the maximum term allowed unless the copyright holder declines such protection.

The plaintiffs, Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive and Richard Prelinger of Prelinger Associates, filed suit in 2004 (Kahle v. Gonzales) seeking to overturn the automatic renewal provision on constitutional grounds."

Friday, January 19, 2007

The Streamburst antipiracy plan: don't use DRM

The Streamburst antipiracy plan: don't use DRM
by NATE ANDERSON
Ars Technica, publication date: 2007-01-19

"A UK startup has some interesting ideas about protecting video content: offer it as high-quality, unencrypted MPEG-4 files already formatted for various user devices. Instead of shackling users with artificial technological limitations on what they can do with their files, Streamburst hopes to secure content using a bit of personalization and a unique watermarking system, and they've already put their system to work selling the Ewan McGregor motorcycle trip documentary Long Way Round."

Thursday, January 11, 2007

My Treatise is Now Available

My Treatise is Now Available
by WILLIAM PATRY
The Patry Copyright Blog, publication date: 10 January 2007
"One reason the book took as long as it did and is as big as it is, was my desire to break out of the specialist's blinders which I had voluntarily donned to my detriment for too many years. For too many years, I believed that copyright law was special, the Cinderella of the law, as some referred to it. This tunnel vision prevented me from understanding how the most important generalists in our society -- members of Congress and federal judges -- see copyright, but it also prevented me from seeing how some lines of case law in copyright law are simply wrong. "

Sunday, January 07, 2007

French court says Sony 'deceived' consumers: watchdog

French court says Sony 'deceived' consumers: watchdog
PARIS (AFP), publication date: 5 January 2007
"Sony has been convicted of misleading the French public and told to pay damages to a consumer watchdog for selling downloadable songs that only run on its own music players, the association has said.

France's Union Federale des Consommateurs (UFC) took Sony's French and British subsidiaries to court in February 2005 over the music download site Sony Connect. The lawsuit also targets Apple, maker of the popular iPod, whose case is expected to reach the courts later this year."

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

Ailing music biz set to relax digital restrictions

Ailing music biz set to relax digital restrictions
by ANTONY BRUNO
Reuters, publication date: 2 January 2007
"Meanwhile, the music industry wants a strong competitor to the monster it created called iTunes. Forcing would-be competitors to sell music incompatible with the popular iPod is not showing any signs of working. Removing DRM would attract powerful new players to the market, and that -- the theory goes -- will result in more buyers."
Ailing music biz set to relax digital restrictions
by ANTONY BRUNO
Reuters/ Billboard, publication date: January 2, 2007
"In 2007, the majors will get the message, and the DRM wall will begin to crumble. Why? Because they'll no longer be able to point to a growing digital marketplace as justification that DRM works. Revenue from digital downloads and mobile content is expected to be flat or, in some cases, decline next year. If the digital market does in fact stall, alternatives to DRM will look much more attractive."

Has the tide turned in Digital Restrictions Management? A nice overview on developments from some of the major players in the online music industry.

Monday, January 01, 2007

Studios’ DVDs Face a Crack in Security

Studios’ DVDs Face a Crack in Security
by JOHN MARKOFF
The New York Times, publication date: January 1, 2007
"An anonymous computer programmer may have skewed the competition over standards for high-definition DVD discs by possibly defeating a scheme that both sides use to protect digital content."